Tenafly High School Science Program

–  Tenafly High School Science Department 2019-2020  –

Incoming Freshmen Classes – See Summer Preparation Indicated with a “♦” Below:

Photo: Jeff Angus | Adam Rendell | Dr. Robert Kennedy | Alan Brandstaedter | Ken Berman | Ryan Van Treuren | Jack Hamperien | Andy Policastro | Aparna Subramaniam | Ann-Marie Bossong | Helen Coyle | Anna Rubenchik | Ghania Layachi | Jenn Halliwell | Matthew White | David Gagliardotto | Will Dove | Grace Woleslagle

– The Instructional Force –

BiologyDr. Robert Kennedy Adam Rendell Jen Halliwell | Jeff Angus | David Gagliardotto | Christopher Icochia
ChemistryKen Berman | Grace Woleslagle Aparna Subramaniam | Jeff Kolb | Ann-Marie Bossong | Will Dove
PhysicsHelen CoyleAndrew Policastro | Matthew WhiteAnna Rubenchik | Alan Brandstaedter 


Instructional Space Locations

Course Sequence at a Glance


422 & 423 (double science incoming 9th grade)
Physical Science Honors Curriculum & Biology Honor
Summer Activities (Physical Science Review)  download
Summer Activities (Biology Honors)    download

 Text Book

COMBINATION SCIENCE FOR FRESHMEN
Grade 9 10 Credits
Prerequisite: A- or better in Algebra 1 and 8th grade Earth Science at the end of January plus department recommendation
These courses incorporate content of Physical Science (405) and Biology (430), plus advanced topics in optics, organic chemistry, plant and human anatomy and physiology. Course pair meets ten periods per week.  and may involve topics in Biology and Physical Science in a different order and include extended inquiry based lab investigations.


435
AP Biology Curriculum
Summer Activities
Text Book

Grades 11-12 6 Credits
Prerequisite: Physical Science, Biology and Chemistry; Algebra 2 or higher math course (concurrent)

FALL: Students explore the exciting chemical and cellular basis of life covering cell morphology, cellular reproduction, molecular genetics and immunology. College level material will prepare students for the Advanced Placement examination given by the College Entrance Examination Board. This course follows syllabus of the College Board.
SPRING: Students build on the work in the fall semester.  Topics covered include biology of organisms and biology of populations and communities. Students are required to perform large animal dissection or an alternate assignment at the conclusion of the semester. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the Advanced Placement Biology examination in May.


430
Biology CPA Curriculum
Summer Activities
Text Book

Grade 10 6 Credits
Prerequisite: Physical Science or Department recommendation

FALL: Students trace the history of biological study and gain understanding of the living cell and its relationships to other cells, heredity, and microbiology. The semester culminates with the study of human anatomy.  Laboratory activities reinforce topics and involve intensive use of the microscope.
SPRING: Topics such as protozoan, algae, fungi, seed plants, and invertebrate animals are studied. Laboratory work continues to help students gain proficiency in use of the microscope as a tool as well as introducing dissection and culture techniques.


431
Biology CPB Curriculum
Summer Activities
Text Book

Grades 10 5 Credits
Prerequisite: Physical Science or CPB Physical Science plus Department recommendation

Biology as a topic is essential for an informed citizen. Centered on levels of organization that make up the living condition, students study cellular chemistry, division, growth and inheritance, followed by specialization at the tissue level, and culminating in the morphology and physiology of organs. Current issues in biology, including environmental concerns and bioethics, are studied. Laboratory work focuses on techniques for viewing and growing cells, manipulating tissues and organs, and involve individual as well as group presentations of experimental results.


432
Biology Honors Curriculum
Summer Activities
Text Book

Grade 10 6 credits
Prerequisite: Physical Science, Algebra 2 or higher math course (concurrent)

During this course, students begin their study of biology with a look at the microscopic world of biology (organic chemicals, cells, genetics, and patterns of heredity.) During the second semester, students will understand the diversity of life through an ecological and evolutionary survey of life forms from bacteria, protists and fungus to plants and animals. The animal study will culminate with a study of the human anatomy. Each semester, long-term inquiry based labs will engage students in the scientific method while they discover how to design and implement controlled experiments. Lab work will continue throughout the year, helping students to gain proficiency in the use of the microscope as well as introduce dissection and culture techniques.


482
AP Environmental Science Curriculum
Summer Activities: Join APES Google Classroom. Email Dr.Kennedy for code to join Classroom for summer work.
Text Book

Grades 10, 11, 12 6 Credits
Prerequisite: Physical Science and Biology

Students are provided with scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to:
-understand the interrelationships of the natural world
– identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made
– evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems
– examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them
College level material covered in this course prepares students for Advanced Placement examination given by the College Entrance Examination Board. This course follows the syllabus of the College Board.


481
Human Anatomy & Physiology CPA Curriculum
(elective course meeting five periods a week) 
Summer Activities
Text Book

Grades 11-12 5 Credits
Prerequisite: Physical Science, Biology and Chemistry

Lab demonstrations are part of the course. Selected topics covered:
– Human Organization (cellular morphology and systems of the body)
– Human Homeostasis (cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, digestive, respiratory and excretory systems)
– Human Movement (skeletal and muscular systems)
– Human Coordination (nervous, sensory and endocrine systems).
Topics in the process of science, advances in medical practice and bioethics are presented initiating exciting class discussion.


472
AP Chemistry Curriculum
Summer Activities
Text Book

Grades 11-12   6 Credits

Prerequisite: Physical Science, Chemistry; Pre-calculus or higher math course (concurrent)

Students work with chemical formulas and equations, chemical bonding and kinetics, and nuclear chemistry. College level material covered in this course prepare students for the Advanced Placement examination given by the College Entrance Examination Board. This course will follow the syllabus of the College Board.  Students enrolled in Advanced Placement Chemistry are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in May.

Prerequisite: Physical Science, Biology (or concurrent with department approval)

FALL: Students are introduced to methods of measurement in chemistry. Matter and its changes, atomic structure, periodic law, electron configuration, chemical bonds and equations, the mole concept, and the kinetic-molecular theory are all studied.  Mathematical and reasoning skills are utilized.  Weekly laboratory experiments enable students to gain first-hand understanding of chemical reactions and analysis, laboratory techniques, and scientific problem-solving. Computers are used for some labs and write-ups.
SPRING: Building on knowledge acquired in the first semester, students investigate topics such as acids, bases, salts, titrations, reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, man’s impact on natural equilibrium, oxidation-reduction reactions, organic reactions, and radioactivity.  Laboratory experiments reinforce concepts studied in class.


468
Chemistry CPB Curriculum
Summer Activities: Welcome to Chemistry CPB
Text Book

Grades 10-12 5 Credits

Prerequisite: Physical Science, Biology, plus Department recommendation.

FALL: Students are introduced to methods of measurement in chemistry and study the nature of matter and its changes, atomic structure, nuclear chemistry, periodic law, electron configuration, chemical bonds, formula writing, and equations. This course involves greater emphasis on descriptive chemistry and qualitative relationships than Chemistry.  Laboratory experiments each week enable students to gain first-hand understanding of chemical reactions, analysis, and laboratory techniques. Organizational and communication skills are emphasized.
SPRING: Building on the knowledge acquired in the first semester, students investigate topics of acids, bases, salts, kinetic-molecular theory, organic chemistry and man’s impact on natural equilibrium, oxidation-reduction. Additional units focus on water, air, and fundamentals of environmental science and technological developments.  Laboratory experiments reinforce concepts studied in class.


464
Chemistry Honors Curriculum
Summer Activities
Text Book

Grades 10-12 6 Credits

Prerequisite: Physical Science and Biology; Algebra 2 or higher math course concurrent

FALL: Students will be introduced to the methods of measurement in chemistry. They will study the nature of matter and its changes, atomic structure, periodic law, electron configuration, chemical bonds, molecular orbitals, equations, the mole concept, and the kinetic-molecular theory. The course involves mathematical and reasoning skills. Laboratory experiments each week will enable students to gain a first-hand understanding of chemical reactions and analysis, laboratory techniques, and scientific problem solving. Computers will be used for some labs and write-ups.
SPRING: Building on the knowledge they acquired in the first semester, students will investigate topics such as acids, bases, salts, titrations, reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, man’s impact on natural equilibrium, oxidation -reduction reactions, organic reactions, radioactivity, and qualitative analysis. Laboratory experiments will reinforce concepts studied in class.


483
Forensic Science CPA Curriculum
Summer Activities
Text Book

Grades 11-12 5 credits

Prerequisite: Two years of high school science, three years recommended

Forensic Science offers an experiential approach engaging students in active learning emphasizing the application of biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science content as each applies.  Students study simulated crime-scenes, performing their own investigations, observations, and evidence collection drawing informed conclusions. Relevant topics include: study of hairs, fibers, and textiles, fingerprinting, DNA fingerprinting; blood, blood spatter, toxicology, soil, pollen and spore examination, forensic anthropology, glass evidence, casts and impressions, tool marks, and ballistics.


484
Methods of Science Research I Honors Curriculum
Summer Activities

Grade 10 5 credits
Prerequisite: acceptance of application by science department; can be taken concurrently with other science courses.

Students learn research methodology in the natural and social sciences by accessing scientific databases, by using on-line bibliographic search techniques, consulting doctoral-level research scholars, developing hypotheses and performing experiments to test them, and by writing research papers and making presentations at scientific symposia. In this course emphasis is placed upon performing experiments in consultation with mentors. Students are expected to spend at least three hours per week outside of class. Available for year-long course of study only.

*The research course is a three-year course in which students choose a topic and carry out an original research project on that topic. The student does ALL of what professional researchers do, from journal readings to finding a mentor, planning a project, and carrying it out to an appropriate research conclusion. During the student’s junior and senior years, he or she may elect to take the course for college credit for a total of up to twelve credits at the State University of New York (SUNY).

Students who have completed research with a mentor, in the summer after their first year in the course, will write a research article in the academic year following their first original research experience. Students who do not have a summer research experience will write a topical review paper in the academic year following the summer between their sophomore and junior year. Students are also required to enter their work into competitions that may the submissions of abstracts, research papers, posters and PowerPoint presentations.

485
Methods of Science Research II Honors Curriculum
Summer Activities

(4 credits through SUNY Albany)
Grades 11 5 credits
Prerequisite: completion of Methods of Science Research 1 and Science Research Internship I

Students learn research methodology in the natural and social sciences by accessing scientific databases by using on-line bibliographic search techniques, consulting doctoral-level research scholars, developing hypotheses and performing experiments to test them, and writing research papers and making presentations at scientific symposia. It is expected that the students will have done many of these activities in the prerequisite high school course, and in this course emphasis is placed upon performing experiments in consultation with mentors. Students are expected to spend at least three hours per week outside of class. Prerequisite(s): completion of one year of an approved course in science research at the high-school
level; permission of instructor; available for year-long course of study only.

*The research course is a three-year course in which students choose a topic and carry out an original research project on that topic. The student does ALL of what professional researchers do, from journal readings to finding a mentor, planning a project, and carrying it out to an appropriate research conclusion. During the student’s junior and senior years, he or she may elect to take the course for college credit for a total of up to twelve credits at the State University of New York (SUNY).

Students who have completed research with a mentor, in the summer after their first year in the course, will write a research article in the academic year following their first original research experience. Students who do not have a summer research experience will write a topical review paper in the academic year following the summer between their sophomore and junior year. Students are also required to enter their work into competitions that may require the submissions of abstracts, research papers, posters and PowerPoint presentations.

486
Methods of Science Research III Honors Curriculum
Summer Activities

(4 credits through SUNY Albany)
Grades 12 5 credits

Prerequisite: completion of Methods of Science Research 1 – Honors, 2 – Honors, and Science Research Internship I

Continuation of work undertaken in Methods of Science Research 2 or equivalent with emphasis placed upon the communication of results. Students are expected to spend at least three hours per week outside of class. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of Methods of Science Research 2 or completion of two years of an approved science research course at the high school level; permission of instructor; students must be enrolled throughout an entire academic year to obtain credit.

*The research course is a three-year course in which students choose a topic and carry out an original research project on that topic. The student does ALL of what professional researchers do, from journal readings to finding a mentor, planning a project, and carrying it out to an appropriate research conclusion. During the student’s junior and senior years, he or she may elect to take the course for college credit for a total of up to twelve credits at the State University of New York (SUNY).

Students who have completed research with a mentor, in the summer after their first year in the course, will write a research article in the academic year following their first original research experience. Students who do not have a summer research experience will write a topical review paper in the academic year following the summer between their sophomore and junior year. Students are also required to enter their work into competitions that may the submissions of abstracts, research papers, posters and PowerPoint presentations.

Methods of Science Research Symposium Annual Video


440
Physics CPA Curriculum
Summer Activities: Physical Science Skills Packet
Text Book

Grades 10-12 6 Credits

Prerequisite: Physical Science, Biology, Algebra 2 or higher math course (concurrent)

FALL: Students will explore the experimental laws and fundamental principles involved in the behavior of the physical universe. Lessons and laboratory work will provide an understanding of kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum. Computers will be used for some labs and write-ups.
SPRING: Study of physical phenomena with an examination waves, physical and geometrical optics and electromagnetism. Additional study may include study of the atom, elementary quantum mechanics, relativity and nuclear physics.


445
Physics Honors Curriculum
Summer Activities
Text Book:

Grades 10-12 6 Credits

Prerequisite: Physical Science, Biology; Algebra 2 or higher math course (concurrent)

FALL: Students explore experimental laws and fundamental principles involved in the behavior of the physical universe in detail. Lessons and laboratory work will provide an understanding of kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, thermodynamics, and kinetic theory. Computers are used for some labs and write-ups.
SPRING: Continuation of the study of physical phenomena with an examination of waves, optics, electromagnetism, relativity, the atom, and nuclear physics.


450
AP Physics C E&M Curriculum
Summer Activities
Text Book

Grades 11-12 6 Credits

Prerequisite: Physical Science, Honors Physics; Calculus, Calculus Concurrent

AP Physics sequence includes two of the four College Board’s courses: 1. AP Physics C: Mechanics  2. AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism. Students are required to take both semesters to earn credit for AP Physics and are required to take the College Board’s AP exam in Mechanics and Electricity and Magnetism. The AP Physics sequence must be completed in the same school year.  AP Physics sequence is calculus-based (including introductory differential and integral calculus) and especially appropriate for students planning to major in physical science or engineering in post-secondary pursuits.

FALL: AP Physics C: Mechanics curriculum. First portion of AP Physics sequence explores kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation, oscillations and gravitation.
SPRING: AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism curriculum. This second portion of the THS AP Physics will explore topics such as electrostatics; conductors, capacitors, and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism will be explored.


450
AP Physics C Mechanics Curriculum
Summer Activities
Text Book

Grades 11-12 6 Credits

Prerequisite: Physical Science, Physics CPA or Physics Honors; Pre-calculus  Must meet the level change requirements if entering from the CPA level.

In this algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course students explore principles of Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. The course is based on six big ideas, which encompass core scientific principles, theories, and processes cutting across traditional boundaries providing broad thinking about the physical world. The following are the big ideas:
•Objects and systems have properties; mass and charge. Systems may have internal structure.
•Fields existing in space can be used to explain interactions
•Interactions of objects with other objects described by forces
•Interactions between systems resulting in changes in those systems
•Changes that occur as a result of interactions are constrained by conservation laws
•Waves can transfer energy and momentum from one location to another without the permanent transfer of mass and serve as a mathematical model for the description of other phenomena.


405
Physical Science CPA Curriculum
Summer Activities
Text Book

Grade 9 – 6 Credits

Prerequisite: Passing score on the NJASK8 in math and in science.
This is a general science course in which students will be introduced to the experimental method of scientific study. Class lessons will increase and support students’ scientific knowledge base and prepare students to ask questions that will later be explored during laboratory investigations. Laboratory activities and investigations will expand upon students’ scientific curiosity and help to develop students’ problem solving and scientific inquiry skills. The content of this course includes: measurements in the metric system, structure of matter, the periodic table, classes of compounds, chemical and physical changes in matter, laws of motion, simple machines and their work capacities, gas laws, waves, heat, light, energy, magnetism and electricity. In addition, the environmental impact of these topics, such as energy, magnetism and electricity. In addition, the environmental impact of these topics, such as energy consumption, will be explored.


406
Physical Science ELL CPB Curriculum
Summer Activities
Text Book

Grade 9 5 Credits

Prerequisite: Passing score on current state tests

Course covers material in Physical Science (405) below at an appropriate pace and scope.


405
PHYSICAL SCIENCE, CPA Curriculum
Summer Activities

Grade 9 6 Credits
Prerequisite: Passing score on current state tests

Introduction to experimental method of scientific study aimed to increase scientific knowledge and prepare students to ask questions during laboratory investigations. Laboratory activities and investigations will expand upon students’ scientific curiosity and help to develop students’ problem solving and scientific inquiry skills. The content of this course includes: measurements in the metric system, structure of matter, the periodic table, classes of compounds, chemical and physical changes in matter, laws of motion, simple machines and their work capacities, gas laws, waves, heat, light, energy, magnetism and electricity. In addition, the environmental impact of these topics, such as energy, magnetism and electricity. In addition, the environmental impact of these topics, such as energy consumption, will be explored.


Retired members of the THS Science Department                            Tenafly High School Science Advisory Group 

 

%d bloggers like this: